Something a little different this week…
Escape From Camp 14 tells the true story of Shin Dong-hyuk, the only person to have ever been born in, and escape from, the North Korean political prison camp known as Camp 14. It details his life from an early age living in the camp, through his escape, and right up to his acclimatization to a society outside of the world’s most secretive country. 
I went into reading this book with very knowledge about North Korea. All I saw was all anyone sees these days; the constant political tensions between South Korea, the occasional rocket launch threatening war, but I knew very little about the actual country, about the actual people that live there. This book doesn’t reveal all that, but it certainly portrays a way of life that you can’t quite believe is still a part of our modern world.
I’m not going to lie to you, this is a hard read. Not just because it details events and atrocities of the most horrifying nature, but also because you see it all through the eyes of a person who seems almost inhuman. Because of his upbringing (if you can call it that), Shin does not share the same ideas of family and loyalty as others do; having been brought up in a world where it is very much a case of survival of the fittest, he is ruthless, heartless, and does not think twice about dobbing in other family members, knowing full well the fatal consequences of doing so. 
If you want to have your eyes opened to a world unimagineable, read this book. It will change your perceptions, not just of North Korea, but of the world and life in general.

Something a little different this week…

Escape From Camp 14 tells the true story of Shin Dong-hyuk, the only person to have ever been born in, and escape from, the North Korean political prison camp known as Camp 14. It details his life from an early age living in the camp, through his escape, and right up to his acclimatization to a society outside of the world’s most secretive country. 

I went into reading this book with very knowledge about North Korea. All I saw was all anyone sees these days; the constant political tensions between South Korea, the occasional rocket launch threatening war, but I knew very little about the actual country, about the actual people that live there. This book doesn’t reveal all that, but it certainly portrays a way of life that you can’t quite believe is still a part of our modern world.

I’m not going to lie to you, this is a hard read. Not just because it details events and atrocities of the most horrifying nature, but also because you see it all through the eyes of a person who seems almost inhuman. Because of his upbringing (if you can call it that), Shin does not share the same ideas of family and loyalty as others do; having been brought up in a world where it is very much a case of survival of the fittest, he is ruthless, heartless, and does not think twice about dobbing in other family members, knowing full well the fatal consequences of doing so. 

If you want to have your eyes opened to a world unimagineable, read this book. It will change your perceptions, not just of North Korea, but of the world and life in general.




(Source: sydneyish)




SPOILER-FREE Review of The Rosie Effect by Graeme Simsion | SUBSCRIBE

Reviewing something a little bit different today.



Was everyone else really as alive as she was?…If the answer was yes, then the world, the social world, was unbearably complicated, with two billion voices, and everyone’s thoughts striving in equal importance and everyone’s claim on life as intense, and everyone thinking they were unique, when no one was.
Ian McEwan, Atonement (via quoted-books)



I decided to do the Sorted Books Art Assignment, proposed by Nina Katchadourian.

Sadly no one in my house has a big enough library to do one on, but I thought seeing as i’m new to BookTube i’d do a few from my own library to help you get to know me a bit more (even if in a very abstract way!)

It was really challenging, but great fun, I’d definitely recommend having a go.



Read as much as you can. Nothing will help you as much as reading.
J. K. Rowling (via money-in-veins)



Bit of a different video today. Decided to talk about some of the books that are coming out over the next few months which i’m most excited about.



Armageddon only happens once you know. They don’t let you go around again until you get it right.
The apocalypse is coming. The end of the world is nigh. Or, at least, it will be if demon, Crowley, and archangel, Aziraphale, can get their act together. Together the two have been tasked with the job of ensuring that the spawn of Lucifer grows up to bring about Armageddon, but what happens when they accidentally lose track of him?
Good Omens, is a witty, clever and, ultimately, very British take on the coming Apocalypse, as told by two of Britain’s greatest sci-fi authors of the modern era, Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman.
I honestly don’t know how I had never heard of this book before, but I am so glad it jumped out at me, from the library shelf, because once I started I simply couldn’t put it down.
Whether or not you’re from a Christian background, we all know the theory behind the apocalypse: Good vs. Evil, Heaven vs. Hell, thrashing it out while humanity watches on and ultimately is laid to waste as a result. But this book really turns that on it’s head and asks the question: what if humanity doesn’t just stand idly by, what if humanity dares to get involved, what then?
And the result is a clever, unique and hilarious book. I have to admit, I have read nowhere near as much of Pratchett and Gaiman’s other works as I should have, but I have read enough to tell you this reflects both of their styles brilliantly; it will keep you guessing, have you laughing out loud, and will take you on one hell of an adventure. 
You’ll like this if you liked: The Hitchiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams

Armageddon only happens once you know. They don’t let you go around again until you get it right.

The apocalypse is coming. The end of the world is nigh. Or, at least, it will be if demon, Crowley, and archangel, Aziraphale, can get their act together. Together the two have been tasked with the job of ensuring that the spawn of Lucifer grows up to bring about Armageddon, but what happens when they accidentally lose track of him?

Good Omens, is a witty, clever and, ultimately, very British take on the coming Apocalypse, as told by two of Britain’s greatest sci-fi authors of the modern era, Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman.

I honestly don’t know how I had never heard of this book before, but I am so glad it jumped out at me, from the library shelf, because once I started I simply couldn’t put it down.

Whether or not you’re from a Christian background, we all know the theory behind the apocalypse: Good vs. Evil, Heaven vs. Hell, thrashing it out while humanity watches on and ultimately is laid to waste as a result. But this book really turns that on it’s head and asks the question: what if humanity doesn’t just stand idly by, what if humanity dares to get involved, what then?

And the result is a clever, unique and hilarious book. I have to admit, I have read nowhere near as much of Pratchett and Gaiman’s other works as I should have, but I have read enough to tell you this reflects both of their styles brilliantly; it will keep you guessing, have you laughing out loud, and will take you on one hell of an adventure. 

You’ll like this if you liked: The Hitchiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams



I want a Cohort I-4 map I see in the background of those Bloomsbury pictures, like for real yo

thefourthorder:

image




sshannonauthor:

I’m like a proud parent.